How to get hit and run

Hit and runz 6485 450x630 How to get hit and run

I did the getaway driver part. (img by Drimagez)

  1. Get the plate number
  2. Make and model of the other vehicle
  3. Description of the driver (and anyone else)
  4. Note the time

I was involved in a hit-and-run the other day. The hit part, not the run part. All said and done, it was the best possible hit-and-run conceivable, except the runner got away (for now).

This can and does happen to people every day, and the results can vary between petty inconvenience and life-altering event.

There are many things you can’t control in a hit-and run, but if you can, those four things are more important than anything else.

That being said, there should probably be:

0.  Don’t panic. Open your eyes and look around. Is anyone bleeding? Crying? Take care of that shit first.

Assuming nobody is bleeding, nobody is crying, get the plate number and the other details if possible. Those are going to be what the police need to follow through on your report.

And yes, you need to report the crime.

Despite the fact that the running vehicle was totally nicer than my car, looking at the damage, for a minute I thought, Shit, I don’t need to get anyone else involved with this. What about my insurance? It’s not really a big deal.

The problem with that line of thought is that you don’t know if it is a big deal or not, and you can’t, because the other party left. Maybe that car is stolen, maybe it’s fleeing the scene of some other crime, maybe it’s just some kid out joyriding—but you can’t assume that it isn’t a big deal. You gotta call the cops.

Because in a movie, that’s the scene where the plucky kid, fresh from being ‘napped, kicks the steering wheel to cause an accident and draw attention to his situation.

Of course, this was in real life, so the driver was all over the road daytime drinking and didn’t want to lose his license, and hit a stopped car with not one but two people who got the plate and the time, which was next another car that got the plate, the make and the model, while in front of the fire chief. Who also got the plate.

Best possible hit-and-run.

Driver description? Looked like a tinted fucking window.

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‘Fast and Furious’ guns ended up in Colombia

gans sebastian 450x206 Fast and Furious guns ended up in Colombia

Columbian police look over confiscated firearms (img by Gans Sebastian/Columbian national police)

tl;dr we armed the fuck out of drug lords everywhere,

@Colombia Reports:

U.S. weapons that were exported to Mexico as part of the controversial “Fast and Furious” program ended up in the hands of Colombia crime syndicate Oficina de Envigado, reported newspaper El Tiempo Monday.

According to the newspaper, investigations by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) have established that some of the weapons found during the arrest of Oficina boss “Sebastian” were part of the thousands of arms lost in the Fast and Furious program.

“Two rifles that were seized in February with ‘Frank’, the brother of Sebastian also are part of the tracking operations of the ATF, the same with 14 Five-seven guns we have found in several raids,” an anonymous high-ranking source within Colombia’s National Police was quoted as saying by El Tiempo.

The source added that ATF agents are in Medellin where the Oficina operates and inspect every seized firearm found in raids in Colombia’s second largest city.

In the U.S., a House Judiciary Committee and the Department of Homeland Security have been investigating the Fast and Furious scandal which is held responsible for the export of at least 2,000 firearms.

Read @Columbia Reports

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Mobile Carriers Gladly Give Your Data to the Cops, But Not to You

847992535 9915965547 450x299 Mobile Carriers Gladly Give Your Data to the Cops, But Not to You

This thing tells the cops where I’ve been and who I’ve been talking to! (img by Braden Kowitz)

tl;dr The headline says it all.

@Wired

The nation’s major mobile carriers have amassed a treasure trove of sensitive data on their customers that they share with police and advertisers — but keep hidden from the consumers themselves.

The major carriers, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon, store who you texted, the content of texts and locational tracking information such as cell-site data, which identifies the cell tower to which a customer was connected at the beginning of a call and at the end of the call. Different companies hold your data for different times. Sprint hoards information the longest, according to a Justice Department survey, keeping your call records for an average of 18-24 months.

But, according to a survey by Pro Publica, the major carriers won’t disclose the data to their customers, for a host of reasons — nonsensical ones at best. But they will gladly hand it over to the authorities, even without warrants.

The survey comes as the government is increasingly looking to use cell-site data to bolster prosecutions in the aftermath of a Supreme Court ruling that said the government must obtain a warrant to affix a GPS device to track a vehicle’s every move.

Read the rest.

You’ve heard this before, but we’re going to keep reminding you because it’s easy to forget. If you want privacy, you’re probably going to have to go analog. And don’t talk about your illegal exploits online.

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Pentagon crackdown on free guns riles some police

Police Militarization 450x299 Pentagon crackdown on free guns riles some police

Atlanta Police S.W.A.T. members searched a building for a shooting suspect in July of 2010 (img by John Bazemore)

@AP/SFGate:

The Defense Department recently fired off a round of letters warning state law enforcement officials to track down every gun, helicopter and Humvee that the military had given them under a $2.6 billion surplus program, or have their access to the handouts cut off.

The problem, according to the states: At least some of them had already turned over that information.

All the same, officials at the Defense Logistics Agency have stopped issuing weapons to thousands of police departments until they’re satisfied they’ve had a full accounting of where all the giveaways have landed. (more…)

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NYCLU Releases ‘Stop and Frisk Watch’ Phone App to Fight Back Against NYPD Stops

@NYCLU:

The New York Civil Liberties Union today unveiled “Stop and Frisk Watch” – a free and innovative smart phone application that will empower New Yorkers to monitor police activity and hold the NYPD accountable for unlawful stop-and-frisk encounters and other police misconduct.

“Stop and Frisk Watch is about empowering individuals and community groups to confront abusive, discriminatory policing,” NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman said. “The NYPD’s own data shows that the overwhelming majority of people subjected to stop-and-frisk are black or Latino, and innocent of any wrongdoing. At a time when the Bloomberg administration vigorously defends the status quo, our app will allow people to go beyond the data to document how each unjustified stop further corrodes trust between communities and law enforcement.” (more…)

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Department of Justice: recording police is constitutionally-protected

Oi shut it otherwise were taking you in 450x454 Department of Justice: recording police is constitutionally protected

Citizen journalism meets agency procedure (img by Teacher Dude's BBQ)

In a win for technology, citizen journalism, and our Constitutional rights, the U.S. Department of Justice has issued a letter to the Baltimore City Police Department reconfirming that photographing, video- and audio-recording on-duty police officers is a Constitutional right protected by the First, Fourth, and Fourteenth Amendments.

“Because recording police officers in the public discharge of their duties is protected by the First Amendment, policies should prohibit interference with recording of police activities except in narrowly circumscribed situations,” reads the DoJ’s letter (.pdf). “More particularly, policies should instruct officers that, except under limited circumstances, officers must not search or seize a camera or recording device without a warrant. In addition, policies should prohibit more subtle actions that may nonetheless infringe upon individuals’ First Amendment rights. Officers should be advised not to threaten, intimidate, or otherwise discourage an individual from recording police officer enforcement activities or intentionally block or obstruct cameras or recording devices.”

This is a direct result of the police, particularly in Baltimore, arresting, hassling, or otherwise harassing people who have been documenting their actions. So in a way, this over-the-top police behavior was a good thing, right? By affirming a constitutionally-protected right? Yeah no, I’m kidding.

Things got even crazier in Connecticut, where a police officer drew a gun on a guy taking pictures, only to be arrested himself later because the guy taking his picture was a police officer, and also, they were at the police station.

The best part was that he was taking the photo of the other cop because he was literally sleeping on the job: (more…)

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